Home News Original Yellow Wiggle Greg Page Urges: “Learn CPR”
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Original Yellow Wiggle Greg Page Urges: “Learn CPR”

Original Yellow Wiggle Greg Page Urges: “Learn CPR”
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By: Clare Bruce

The original ‘Yellow Wiggle’ Greg Page, who had a brush with death in January, has posted a video urging people to learn CPR, and advocating for more life-saving Automatic External Defibrillators (AED machines) to be kept in public places.

In the video, Page explains in detail why he had a heart attack on January 17, explaining it was nothing to do with his pre-existing health condition that caused him to leave the Wiggles in 2006, but rather was an unexpected blockage caused by plaque and blood clotting.

“A small amount of plaque in one of my arteries broke free due to the turbulent blood flow caused by the amount of physical exertion during the show,” he explained. “As part of its defense, [my body] caused blood to clot in the artery. And very quickly and without warning, my artery was 100 percent blocked.”

“As a result my heart stopped, and I stopped breathing.”

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He goes on to explain how quick-thinking and fast-acting individuals, including Kim Antonelli, Steve Pace, Grace Jones, and Therese Wales, saved his life.

“My heart was shocked back into rhythm, with three shocks of the AED machine by a nurse and bystanders who by chance happened to be at the show and knew how to use the defibrillator,” he explains.

“It’s only due to the CPR that was commenced so quickly, and the fact that the Castle Hill RSL Club had an AED on site and readily available, and that there were people around that knew how to use the machine, that I’m able to tell you this story myself today.”

“It’s only due to the CPR, an AED readily available, and that there were people that knew how to use the machine, that I’m able to tell you this story today.”

Page says he has decided to learn CPR, and now believes “CPR is a skill that everyone should know”. He wants to see AED machines installed in all public places and workplaces, and even potentially in homes.

“These machines should be as readily available as fire extinguishers, fire blankets and smoke detectors,” he said. “It’s hoped that they’re never needed, but with more awareness and more availability of these life-saving practices throughout our community we can all rest assured that many more lives can be saved, just as mine was. And for that, I’m eternally grateful.”

Article supplied with thanks to Hope Media.

About the Author: Clare is a digital journalist for the Broadcast Industry.